Follow Michael Betancourt on Twitter Facebook Fan Page

Movies by Michael Betancourt

Instagram


   About
   Aesthetics
   Art
   Avant-GardeMovies
   Betancourt
   CinemaNews
   CultureCrit
   Digital Capitalism
   General
   Glitch & Postdigital
   How-To
   Motion Graphics
   Movies
   New Publications
   News
   Piracy
   Reviews
   Shows
   Theory
   Visual Music
   Visual Research
   Watch Movies

 exhibitions [pdf]
 updates
 books

 
 
iPhone
 



   avant-garde movies, motion graphics, and theory
 
 
by Michael Betancourt
 

This site presents extracts from Michael Betancourt's current research and writing projects, with news about current developments. A portfolio of finished, published writing is available here.

His trilogy of studies on film theory using title sequences as a model uniting avant-garde, documentary and commercial motion pictures were published in the Routledge Studies in Media Theory and Practice series: Semiotics and Title Sequences, Synchronization and Title Sequences, and Title Sequences as Paratexts.

His theory of on-screen juxtaposed and composited imagery, Beyond Spatial Montage: Windowing, or, the Cinematic Displacement of Time, Motion and Space, concerned with the results of a 25-year long studio-based research project was published by Focal Press.

If you are looking for more on agnotology, digital capitalism or automated/immaterial labor, look at The Digital, which presents links to his most recent published articles and other research on the political economy of digital capitalism contained in his book:

The Critique of Digital Capitalism identifies how digital technology has captured contemporary society in a reification of capitalist priorities. The theory proposed in this book is the description of how digital capitalism as an ideologically invisible framework is realized in technology.

If you are looking for his movies, you can watch them here.

More articles, reviews, interviews, and translations are posted on MichaelBetancourt.com


 



Naming the Glitch, New Aesthetic & Post-Digital

story © Michael Betancourt | published July 25, 2017 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Glitch & Postdigital

The convergence of immaterial digital processes and the physical world is an increasingly obvious part of everyday experience, and has been steadily getting more attention since the start of the twenty-first century. There is nothing new about this relationship, which has been developing since at least the 1980s, but what is of interest is how these developments have stopped being new and simply become a part of everyday reality, accepted and largely ignored as just an aura of the digital. The variety of terms attempting to name these developments reveals the different approaches and concerns of the people introducing them: as challenge, as celebration, as philosophical shift.




read more



 

Flow and Friction: a thesis on tactical glitching

story © Michael Betancourt | published July 24, 2017 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Glitch & Postdigital

I recent read my copy of Vendela Grundell's book, Flow And Friction: On The Tactical Potential Of Interfacing With Glitch Art and was pleasantly surprised to see my critical framework for considering 'glitch art' being applied to a new area, web design. I would be interested to see her analysis applied to media works as well, rather than just publications, but I can see the importance of art history working with web media. I am glad to see more work being done on the convergence of glitch processes and tactical media.






 

Going Somewhere - reviewed by David Finkelstein

story © Michael Betancourt | published July 12, 2017 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Betancourt

David Finkelstein wrote a review of my movie serial Going Somewhere for Film International called "Recombinant Modification of Sci Fi Going Somewhere (2015)" that's available online:

Something fascinating and strange is going on in Going Somewhere, an ongoing movie serial by Michael Betancourt, with individual episodes which are all 7 minutes long. The source material for these digital mini-epics comes from a variety of science and science fiction materials: old Grade Z Sci Fi epics, civil defense films and WWII documentaries, NASA footage. Betancourt uses sophisticated datamoshing and databending techniques to completely transform these materials. These techniques reach inside of the numbers which store digital video and mess up the data in more or less controlled ways that morph one image into the next. They allow Betancourt to radically change the original colors and forms.

Also available as a [pdf] for download






 

'Glitch Art' as a Movement?

story © Michael Betancourt | published July 10, 2017 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Glitch & Postdigital

Recently, I was asked during the Q&A after a talk if I think glitch art is a movement. The problem with calling the amorphous collection of people working with glitch art a movement is precisely its shapelessness: the things being done and called glitch art have been around and in use by artists since the late 1970s and first started to become prominent during the 1990s, emerging more-or-less independently in places as diverse as London, Chicago, Oslo and Miamiall places also associated with the use of glitches in electronic and avant-garde music. This plurality of origins makes any suggestion of a movement highly questionable: there were no manifestos, no proclamations that circulated across all these origin-sites. Instead, the use and embrace of glitches appears to have happened more or less simultaneously, as a result of the faults and failures of digital technology in the 1990s, especially the vagaries and interruptions common to dial-up internet access and the slow speeds of download that would often result in partial and damaged files. The embrace of glitch by this initial collection of artists (whose work from 2003 and earlier was collected in the Glitch: Designing Imperfection book) was highly dispersed geographically and aesthetically, even if they shared formal similarities because of the technologies involved.




read more



 

a note on 'The Fantasy of Equivalence'

story © Michael Betancourt | published July 9, 2017 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Digital Capitalism

The capitalist conception as labor value being wholy dependent on the amount of time required for production, described by Karl Marx as a foundational principle of his critique, depends on an assumption of equivalence between not only differently skilled labor, but on the products of that labor. This fantasy authorizes the valorization of intellectual labor and production regardless of its validity within the database: the precession of agnotology around this apparent relativism depends on the same beliefs in equivalence, a reification of abstract principle as instrumentality. Marxs analytic reveals this fallacy precisely in setting aside the issues of distinction between labor in order to advance an abstraction of that productive processhis disregard for the material differences between skilled an unskilled labor mirrored the labor-intensive productive processes of the period when he developed his critique: the concern with the productive capabilties of unskilled labor as a constraint on production provides a literal limit on the production work performed, for example, by child labor.